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Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Suffering...

In the words of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, “Suffering is not optional. It seems to be part and parcel of the human condition, but suffering can embitter or ennoble.”

Well , when you get the "full" impact of the locomotive traveling full speed ahead, head on...and you're not even cognisant there's a train approaching...you want to transcend the planet, be loftily carried away into oblivion, creating your very own black hole in the cosmos. I mean a black hole that has your name engraved along the edges...make NO mistake it's yours and yours only that sucks you in , in a speed-of-light second. It is in that being that very moment, the essence of your being human, "humanity" takes a STAND in the very center of that track and you STAND. You STAND for all that's there AND all that's not there. Being with it all, the good , the bad, and the UGLY. You stop the train...

THEN you suffer...you take on the "not optional ". The question that remains...."how long?"

embitter...or ennoble... CHOOSE

7 comments:

Bill said...

I tried to post a comment to you earlier, but it apparently didn't take. My concern is that your comments about suffering can't have come out of thin air, but your sentences are too disjointed and filled with ellipses for the reader to have any understanding of the specifics of your situation. Makes it very difficult to offer advice, suggestions, or simple sympathy. What's wrong, June? Perhaps you're in need of a life coach. All the best.

June Kellogg said...

Hi Bill
I GOT your communication...thanks for sharing. I got what you said AND what you didn't say. The suffering was a present situation in my OWN life...and chose not to let everyone in. Simply an expression of my very own pain & suffering dealing with my own "fundamental darkness". (Nichren Diashonin Buddhism) I am a human being ...being human. Bill, i want to acknowledge you for being generous, compassionate and fully self expressed. You make a difference...

Bill said...

I can certainly understand your not wanting to share personal troubles with a blog readership, but my hope is that you have someone available to you to talk things out with. You seem to be a person with a great passion for finding the meaning in life's events; your references to philosophers and contemplative thinkers gives proof to that, but sometimes a more mundane conversation with someone over a cup of coffee can have better effect in dealing with everyday problems. Relying solely on wise books can be too impersonal and lead to a hothouse insularity of thinking. This would be the complete opposite of what you're striving for. Having said all of this, let me apologize if I've misinterpreted anything you've written or your situation. All the best and stay well.

June Kellogg said...

Bill, NO apology necessary. I watch lots of film, particularly foreign, which brings out the drama queen within...intense.
Merci beaucoup ! As you may have gathered, i allowed myself to be completely enrolled in my "meltdown" around circumstances. All we are is who we are and our circumstances. We own it all...like it or not. In the final hour it's all empty and meaningless. Have you come across Dan Millman's "The Life You Were Born to Live" ? He also wrote: "The Way of the Peaceful Warrior" and the movie "Peaceful Warrior" Just another place to look... by the way I am 50% Swede and we so love our java (and Bergman)! Granted the "hot house" can be stifling. Having been fortunate to tour the Doris Duke greenhouse before it closed, experienced "magical", "magnificent" and sometimes "stifling". Doris was extraordinary...a visionary: light years ahead of her time. The orchids were spectacular. Mundane...for me, that is by the ocean, taking in all the "negative ions", mundane and yet the source of vitality restoration, being passionately alive and playful.

Bill said...

Daniel Milman is a tad too New Age for me. For a challenging and fascinating read I would recommend "The Denial of Death" by Ernest Becker. For a whimsically inspiring movie, see if you can scare up a copy of the early 80's Scottish film "Local Hero". Stay well. All is not necessarily meaningless in the end, though God knows it seems that way much of the time.

June Kellogg said...

Hi Bill
Viewed "Local Hero" and have to admit wholeheartedly it was worth the watch. The message was subtle yet profound. I was left with a sense divine simplicity about our humanity. We, in our human beingness love to complicate it all, all the time. Thank you for your suggestion. I'll look for the book and keep you posted. Have FUN ! JK

Bill said...

Haven't seen your blog for a wee while, but I was glad to read that you found and enjoyed "Local Hero".
I think you'll find the book interesting, too, though admittedly a bit more dense. Stay well.

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"Thoughts are things, and their fairy like wings, go forth to bring back, that which you sent forth from your mind..." Germaine Benton